Monday, August 10, 2009

Healthcare debates are turning into shouting matches



Wow, healthcare reform debates aren't just debates anymore. They're turning into shouting matches that are including death threats. According to this story on CNN:
Senators this week joined their colleagues from the House at town hall meetings as they spent their August recess in their home districts. But disruptive protests are turning town hall meetings into shouting matches and drowning out discussion over what is and isn't in health care plans in the House and Senate.
Now this is scary:
Democratic Rep. Brad Miller of North Carolina even had a death threat phoned into his office. A caller said that if Miller supported Obama's plan, it could cost him his life, Miller told CNN.
Here's another interesting snippet:
Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin fueled the charge on her Facebook page Friday, writing that "the sick, the elderly, and the disabled" would suffer as doctors have to "ration care."
The bottom line can be summarized here:
As the emotion has intensified, misinformation has spread about what is and isn't in current health care proposals.
I have found that so many people truly are misinformed about the healthcare reform proposals that are currently floating out there. It's so easy to spread viral e-mails or short little tweets on Twitter that are not accurate. Let's hope that consumers and healthcare professionals can be properly educated so that misinformation doesn't lead to more serious problems in this country.

4 comments:

  1. What makes people in this country not think that if they have health insurance currently that the Insurance company is not telling you what to do Is that not controlling you. They tell you what doctors you can use only in networkss as well as what hospitals only in network Sure you can use an out of network doctor but it wil l cost you more and then they all taut this Healt care fund that in the long run cost you more money thna they tell you . The insurance companies also tell you doctor what test he can have you take I think that is more controlling . Also let's not forget medicine they deicide if you should have the medicien prescribed to or a generic who not always works the same

    ReplyDelete
  2. The argument is not to reform or not to reform our current healthcare system.
    Everyone I have spoken to that is against the current plan proposed, agrees that some reform is necessary.

    1) Why not focus on what’s broken and fix that vs. a complete takeover of the healthcare system by the government? There are many of us that are very pleased with our healthcare (80%-85%).

    2) Why this “rush, rush get this thing passed”? I would like to see us take our time with this extremely important cause that could permanently change American lives.

    3) In the current state of the economy, is this the time to add a $1.6 trillion dollar deficit to the country? Who’s going to pay for this? (Taxing the rich alone will not even come close to paying for this and printing money will further devalue the dollar and take us into inflation, resulting in everything costing more)

    I believe the above questions are valid and reasonable.

    ReplyDelete
  3. The argument is not to reform or not to reform our current healthcare system.
    Everyone I have spoken to that is against the current plan proposed, agrees that some reform is necessary.
    1) Why not focus on what’s broken and fix that vs. a complete takeover of the healthcare system by the government? There are many of us that are very pleased with our healthcare (80%-85%).
    2) Why this “rush, rush get this thing passed”? I would like to see us take our time with this extremely important cause that could permanently change American lives.
    3) In the current state of the economy, is this the time to add a $1.6 trillion dollar deficit to the country? Who’s going to pay for this? (Taxing the rich alone will not even come close to paying for this and printing money will further devalue the dollar and take us into inflation, resulting in everything costing more)
    I believe the above questions are valid and reasonable.

    ReplyDelete
  4. One of the excellent aspects of the current American health care system is that most people can get immediate help if they become very ill. Not true in places like Canada or the UK, where waiting lines for crucial imaging tests can range in the several months, which can mean the difference between living and dying. USA rates are #1.

    Research shows that cancer patients live longer in the United States than anywhere else on the globe.

    A federally run plan would drive insurance companies, hospitals and doctors into bankruptcy, leaving only the government to provide coverage, often called single payer system.

    In England, obese people are not allowed specific procedures because they are not the most productive segment in society.

    I’m not making this up. A friend in the medical field in London had provided me with the info.

    ReplyDelete

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